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different from john paul ii who was this media savvy loved pope that loved to come out and do big speech and address the big crowds so the pope is kind of going away and stepping aside in a very low key manner as he leaves the whole of his upon tir kate. shocking but not unexpected hinting in the past that a pope is -- if he doesn't feel the strength to carry on, he should resign or abdicate in this case. >> thank you very much. here with now contributor father robert barren. can you put the benedict papacy in to context? pope john paul ii, massive. this one's different. what's the legacy in your mind? >> well, i think he sees the papacy very much in continuity of john paul ii. they were both men of the council. they were at vatican 2 and contributed and i think both saw an attempt to interpret vatican 2 properly. i would say that's the major contribution of pope benedict. he wanted to read vatican 2 as a an evangelical council, a council to get the message of the faith out to the wider world and i think in koont knewty with john paul and that's probably the major legacy. >> father, this
ratzinger was known as john paul ii's enforcer of religious doctrine. he did not like answering questions. here's brian ross asking him about a sexual abuse case in 2002. >> come to me when the moment is given. but not yet. >> reporter: it is almost eight years as pope, he would sometimes play the piano. he always wore his red shoes. but his passion was preaching the gospel. he never enjoyed being an administrator and he paid a price for that. his papacy will be remembered for its scandals. those endless sexual abuse coverups that cost more thbilli. during a financial scandal, tried and failed to clean up corruption. and the vatileaks scandal. a vatican back-stabbing in intrigue. he may have been the first pope to tweet, but as the leader, he tried to hold back the forces, refusing to expand the role of women. now, though, he is accepting the reality of the modern world. and the catholic church enters new territory. can the church cope with having an ex-pope alive while a new pope tripes to create his own legacy? >> this is the tremendous question that lies before us. there is no job desc
understand that people that are close to benedict and to john paul ii are -- he has thrown a real wrench in the church and how it's going to move forward and because he is such a clever man in the sense of how he was clever in enforcing the doctrines of the church which in fact have caused the church an awful lot of trouble, are these cardinals going to interpret some of them, this as a sign that things need to be shaken up in a major way? there's always talk in the conclave before the pope is elected. got the find out exactly what had happened in that conclave and how political and inventive he is. to re-evaluate the role of the church in the modern world. pope benedict has said that the pope, he, his papacy is not succeeding in the modern world, and something has to be changed and he has made a great act of changing by leaving, some are calling it a secular act, also part of his message today that he is not going to be vod in the politics of what comes next. in the real sense it might be moving for him to say it, i think it went without saying, he was n't going to interfere in this pro
john paul ii shock happened the catholic church and the rest of the world when he made this announcement this week. >> after examined my conscious before god i came to a certainty my strength due to advanced age are no longer suited to the adequate exercise of the ministry. >> it was a remarkable announcement, first pope in over 600 years to actually step aside instead of leaving the papacy in the point much death. i want to say thank you, pope john paul ii . the reason why, as i would say thanks to your predecessor pope john paul ii. this is it a evangelical and not a catholic who appreciates the firm convictions of the catholic church and popes who decipeded that the purpose of the church is not a mere thermometer reflecting the culture of whatever the world happens to believe in the given moment, but believes that the church is to be the thermostat that can read the culture that is it prevalent in the world, but whose purpose is to adjust the temperature of the culture to what it ought to be . for that, i say thank you for faithful service to the bible, and to the tr
. >> reporter: benedict seemed to many a reluctant pope, as cardinal ratzinger under john paul ii, he was known as a conservative guardian of church doctrine, opposing women priests, abortion and homosexuality. as pope, he inherited the church's biggest scandal in decades. revelations that priests had sexually abused children. he met with victims and apologized. >> for all, i express my deep sorrow to the innocent victims of these despicable crimes. >> reporter: he met the arduous demands of the modern papacy. today he said that will end in just 17 days. the pope will eventually move into a monastery for cloistered nuns in the vatican. officials say he will dedicate his time to prayer and reflecti reflection. >> richard engel, thanks. >>> for a lot of american catholics, this pope was a man whose name they heard once a week at mass. a relative enigma compared to john paul ii, of course. an old fashioned man in modern times. and now the question for catholics and their church becomes what next. nbc's anne thompson is here with us, with part of that story. anne, good evening. >> reporter: we're i
wanted to retire when he worked for john paul ii, asked him, john 35u8 ii, would not let that happen. he became pope after john paul ii died, but he never seemed to enjoy it the way john paul ii did, who was an actor. benedict is a scholar, a theologian, an intellectual, and today you could see the humility that those who know him very well say have always marked this 85-year-old man. >> certainly describing himself as a pilgrim is really extraordinary, and you get the feeling that the crowd, the audiences were responding to him in an emotional way that they hadn't previously. that i guess it's the moment the history, but also the sadness. i mean, this is a very bittersweet moment. >> well, it's -- it is. that's exactly the way to describe it. you know, it's interesting in st. peters square, they had the big jumbotrons out there, and people were gathered around and were actually silent in st. peters square watching what happened, and the last time i heard that kind of silence in st. peters square it was when they announced the death of john paul ii. you never heard a cell phone go off. y
hagel gets blocked at least for now. rand paul and others are threatening to block john brennan. susan rice didn't get to the nomination process. is this rocky road if that's how we want to describe it, david, does this hurt the president's credibility or at least his ability to get things done, a small distraction, should it become a smaller one? put it into the wider con tech in terms of what the white house want to be accomplishing right now. >> it does take away according to past presidents, national security is where one says the president says it's a precedent to do this. it's a time that we have a lot of things going on in terms of the president's foreign policy, particularly in the middle east and withdraw in afghanistan coming to the fore and you need someone in the pentagon doing this. it can be seen as a nuisance in that the president want to be talking about his agenda, which is the gun control, immigration, things that people can get done. you have, of course, this sequester and the ongoing issue of the spending situation and taxes. so i think these are the things that the
that this pope hasn't done or even pope john paul ii that can change that perception? >> sure. i think that this pope certainly has had a papacy plagued with scandal and i think that was a clear signal to the next pope that their key task will be healing those divisions and that's going to come with more transparency and certainly transformation in our church. >> sister louise acres is a members of the sisters of charity. she was here on "jansing & co." yesterday. here's what she had to say about women in the church. >> i think the catholic church, the roman catholic church is probably one of the last bastians of sexism. i think there's a growing resistance to the status quo today and a growing movement to suggest changes. >> the sister went on to say that women in the priesthood could be one possible solution and i'm wondering what your reaction is to those comments? >> absolutely. i think it's one component of the transformation we need to see. but we can't just add women in stir, right? we need to fully transform our church, look at those policies and practices that we have that are
, he watched as a close advisor and close friend, john paul ii, in his last years as pope, and he saw not only the angst that john paul ii went through during that time of suffering, but he also saw how the vatican works when there's a pope that's not able to at his full capacity to do his job. something he obviously had in mind in the past that he could do it. it's very surprising he did. >>steve: father jonathan are you suggesting that the pope saw pope john paul ii in his declining years and said the people of the catholic community need a pope who's at 100% or as close to it as possible, so if i ever get to that stage i'm going to call it quits, and that's what he's doing? >> you know, it seems that that is a big part of his decision. we know how close he was to john paul ii. keep in mind, though, the pope is not a manager. this is why it's so shocking. the pope is not first and foremost the manager. he's the defender of the faith, protecting or guarding the teaching of the church and of the gospel. so you don't need somebody who is a stellar manager at his full capacity necessari
april 2005 who took over for the immensely popular pope john paul ii. his papacy has been marked by controversy. the pope criticized for how he handled the situation in his prior jobs when he was archbishop in germany and later a top vatican official. on a visit to america in 2008, he became the first pope to meet with the victims themselves. on a lighter note, benedict has become known as his personal idiosyncracies like his bright red shoes. he's been using a moveable platform to carry him down the aisle of st. peters basilica. this morning after he made his announcement, he was helped down from his chair. while this is a surprise the pope has said in the past that he reserved the right to resign if he felt too old to perform his duties. what's next? he still hopes to serve the church through a life dedicated to prayer. elizabeth, back to you. >> greg, good morning to you. lot of people really surprised by the announcement this morning. some cardinals in the audience didn't understand what pope benedict was saying? >> that's also true. one of those occasions in rome the pope ac
-to-day basis. i think we would be looking for vigorous and dynamic leadership, perhaps in the mold of john paul ii. >> archbishop of milan, the archbishop of vienna, gmt enoa, italy, two vatican cardinals in the mix, do you agree with the monsignor about the qualities of what needs to be considered as we look to who would take benedict's place? >> yes, i think the monsignor is absolutely -- as somebody who has studied this, the church has become quite diverse. while there's been a decline of things catholic in places like the united states, that is not the case in places like africa, latin, central america, central mexico. the activity has quite energized, so make a prediction that you'll see a greater voice of those communities, nigeria, brazil, mexico, because the catholic church and the conclave in particular has become more diversified over the years. don't forget john paul ii was the first known italian in 453 years, nobody ever believed that, so here we are 2013, and you might see a seismic change again. >> ray flynn, monsignor tom mcsweeny, thank you for joining me. i really appreciate i
suffering is meant to respond to that. he's well aware of what john paul ii did, for instance, stay in office until the very end, suffering physically. and in an extreme and public way was legitimate. he's saying, given the situation -- >> and as you look back over his -- >> such that he's -- so far. >> excuse me, father. as you look back over his papacy, what will he will remembered most for? >> i think he'll be remembered, above all, as a teaching pope for his books about the life, his encyclicals. the books about the life of jesus have been profound. it will take years to unpack all of the profundity of his thought. he's done a great service to the church already in his service to john paul ii. >> father john wauck, thank you very much. the first pope to have an account on twitter. >> the first pope ever to tweet. he's 85 years old. pope john paul ii was 84 when he died. wlerned after he died he considered twice resigning because of his ill health. this sets up a political process with the conclave electing the next pope. dan harris joining us on this discussion. it was a quick p
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
was elected as a caretaker pope. following john paul ii. that was a hard act to follow. they were looking for an elderly pontiff who would not be in position for that long and also there was no way anybody was going to top john paul ii in terms of charisma, in reaching out to the young, and, unfortunately, they didn't get a salgzman for catholicism in this particular pope, which will be a very important ingredient for the next one. >> he also had the burdens of dealing with the scandals after 27 years of john paul ii. he had to focus on the apology, the fact that he had actually met individually in his role as cardinal ratzinger investigating some of the problems of the abuse in the american church. >> he did go some way in terms of, you know, issuing an apology from the pope as a pretty lofty ideal, but, many of the, we still have a problem, many of the, worldwide with the sex scandal and the catholic church. they haven't addressed it at all levels. the vatican can pools. they can set lawsuits. there are a lot of damaged people out there who were basically abused as children, and no matt
celebration, he did look weaker and weaker, but then he again he is an 85-year-old man. john paul ii before him was even in worse shape and he did not resign. nobody was really expecting him to resign or abdicate, as was said in a previous conversation. so, it did come as a surprise, for sure. we have, just right here at the vatican right now in st. peter's square, there are a few faces that express his belief when asked what the cameras are all about. i'm telling them that the pope is about to resign. nobody can really believe that because that is unprecedented in modern times. there was a pope in the 13th century that resigned but certainly this hasn't happen ed >> there is concern that this is more than just a pope aging, that there are more health concerns. have you heard anything like that? >> reporter: there are a lot of allegations, of course, in the house of pope benedict xvi, a lot of rumors going around in the past few months that he wasn't doing so well. but as usual as ever with the vatican, it's always very fickle to get complete and full survey on the actual health of the pope
at the time of pope john paul ii's ilniz. and i think it's much more important to have a vital individual there to carry on as pope, so i think the pope made what i think will now be a precedent-setting decision. >> i think there's no doubt in that. with the advances in medical technology, if they could continue to essentially live out their lives as pope. so somebody we'll be discussing in the coming days. i want to switch gears and talk about the state of the union. glen rush from politico writing that it will be less of a olive branch. if that's the strategy, what do you think of it? do you think it's the time what most americans seen -- the time is right for the president to push hard? >> well, you know, they always ask the question, the state of the union is, fill in the blank. i think the state of the union is strong, but the state of economy is weak. we have too many people looking for jobs and too many people who have given up looking for jobs. he never menned -- so let's get together, put people back to work. he can approve the pipeline and the other is to approve free trade with
done in 719 years. he has decided to ab -- he was elevated to the papacy after the death of pope john paul ii. news of this is reverb rating around the country and around the world. nearly one quarter of the united states, 74 million americans, are catholic, and worldwide there are 1.1 billion members of the church. >> encompassing a range of issues from contraception to policy. the timing of the announcement comes as a surprise. just two days before ash wednesday, which marks the start of the lentin season, the holyist period on the catholic calendar. joining us from washington, the host of msnbc's "hardball" chris matthews, and contributor and washington post columnist e.j. deon. chris, my colleague, the light in the darkness on many things political. >> right. >> what do you make of this announcement coming as it does two days before ash wednesday? it seems like a major surprise. to what degree do you think the catholic church will seize on this as a moment to pivot? >> you may think so, but i don't think so. i don't think it's going to be a moment of pivot. i think it's probably p
all been worked out by a decree that pope john paul ii came up with maybe three years before he died, and the critical moment which is sort of an answer to your question. the criminal moment is when each cardinal has the ballot in his hands, and before he puts it in the urn, he has to repeat an oath, and you're standing in front of michelangelo's last judgment, so that wall adds always to the deal. you have this in your hand. you say something like this. i can't translate it exactly from latin. you call upon the lord jesus, my savior, as my witness. he who will judge me. you are looking at the -- he who will judge me that the man i am voting for is the one who under god i believe god wants to be pope. in a certain sense it makes it not any more an election. it makes it a discernment. you are trying to figure out what you think god would want. what man you think god would want for all the needs of the church today. it's a fascinating moment. you do it every time you vote, so it's something -- you never can forget. >> well, i never knew that before. you bring this new information that
pope john paul ii. >> do you think this is overshadowed over a time that should be honoring pope benedict? >> yes. i think it is. he's a humble man, a very kind man. if you were to meet him and you're a nobody, he speaks to you as if you're the most important person in the world. he's a very humble world. in his heart, he's a good man. he loves the church and wants the best for the church. think about it. is there anyone in the world who has put down power willingly? >> certainly in this country. when is the conclave going to start? >> probably monday the congregations will begin and shortly there after they will start that conclave. they want a pope by easter. they know the world is watching them. it's important to the church and to the larger world. >> father, great to have you here. >> thank you. appreciate it. >>> that wraps up this hour of "jansing & co." i'm chris can jansing. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't
choosing a quieter life. so very different from his predecessor john paul who stayed until the very end. anthony from pennsylvania witnessed both pope's last sermons. >> they're courage in different ways. in opposite ways but the same degree of courage. >> reporter: the pope summoning the strength to say good-bye, giving up one of the most powerful roles on earth. meeting publicly with the faithful one last time. >> savannah as the pope got up to leave. there was a wave of emotion. people calling out to him, waving good-bye. many people held up banners saying thank you in return. pope benedict told the faithful i have never felt this way. >> thank you. greg burke is the senior communications adviser just with the pope in the final audience. good morning it's good to see you. >> good morning. >> sometimes tone can be lost in translation. you heard this address. how does the pope seem to you these last few days? what's his mood? . he's a serene person. i have known him as cardinal ratzinger. he took a lot of hits from john paul ii. i see him now calmer than ever. he showed a little emotio
is his humility. he almost shrugged and said compared to john paul ii, he said, boy, i don't know if i'm up for this but i'll given it a shot. he's winsome in his frailness and humanity. >> and such humanity covering this story, that he was getting his arms around. he took us to rome and vatican. we were there in june of 2011. his love for not only the man but his institution. it was evident then. >> he took us around and gave us a tour i will never forget. >> anyway, we hope to be spend a lot of time with cardinal dolan over the coming weeks. we thank him for coming by this morning. >> one of the many people adjusting to this news. let's turn to george weigel. it's good to see you. >> hi, savannah, how are you? >> very well. this is being framed as an act of great humility. you have to go back to the middle ages to find somebody that add voe indicated the papacy in this matter. what do you think the legacy of pope benedict will be? >> i think pope benedict is the greatest preacher in the world today. he has a remarkable capacity to express the beautiful truth of the christian faith in
, it has made a huge difference. in east philly, john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> it used to be on lockdown. >> reporter: captured on a cell phone at a nearby middle school common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> reporter: the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors, "jones jail." last september, eighth grader travon williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> reporter: school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and face lift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models and believe in education and development and people that had a commitment to america and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> reporter: patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipient. his older brother is a marine. since service was in his blood, he joined the
. john is right. paul ryan was against it, the president walked away from it, we could not get a bipartisan consensus for a plan that would revitalize the economy, produce growth and create jobs. it is a tragedy. >> i talked to a republican congressman why not vote for sink such and they say because of tax increases but i say you have already raised taxes, they have done that. >> the real answer they will not put the country first. how do we grow our economy? this washington game is all about their power and position and why the congress has 11 percent rating together. >> gentleman, all love to talk to you about what is going on in our country. can you get more from the political insiders every monday at 10:30 a.m. eastern and they will be back here next sunday, you can also follow them on twitter at "insiders." >>heather: a consume group is pushing the f.d.a. to put the squeeze on how much sugar goes into your favorite soft drink but is government regulation the answer? hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for s
view her favorable. president obama second at 51%. paul ryan, marco rubio, john boehner, all far behind. joining me now karen tumulte and david goodfriend. thank you for joining me. the analysis of the seven-point dive there, if that's the accurate word here, why do you believe the approval rating is sinking from december? >> a couple of things. in december, we just come off the large presidential election where both he and his republican opponents spent inordinate amounts of money to get the point across and people weigh the two messages. mitt romney versus barack obama and now left with sort of a generic feeling of the public how do you think things are going? as you put on the screen, most americans don't feel things are going well and will blame that on an incumbent. that having been said, the president's approval ratings are still strong as you point out, strong relative to congress and historical trends. i happen to think that the biggest news out of that poll is even after the republicans tried to tar her with benghazi, hillary clinton remains unbelievably strong and i think that
. >> let's bring in our tuesday gaggle. perry bacon jr., solinda lake and john feehery. john, i'll start with you. this is, i assume, you like hearing the words you are hearing from whether it's eric cantor, paul ryan or what we used there with bobby jindal. the question is, how does the republican party turn words into actions of trying to become persuaders? >> i think they have to channel their inner jack kemp. they have to think about, how do we get off the fiscal discipline message, which is really a bob dole message and get into an economic growth message. how do we lift all boats? jack kennedy and jack kemp. that's important for republicans. they can't just talk about how to cut spending. talk about why their policies are going to help people get back to work and get more flexibility in their lives and how it's an impediment to their daily lives. voters understand that but our party is characterized by the fiscal stuff and the social stuff. and there ain't -- they are not able to get beyond that conversation. >> it goes -- solinda, before we started you said, boy, this looks like t
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)